Help for Adults

As adults, we are expected to know it all, be able to handle it, after all, we’re adults, all grown up now. Though more mature, life comes at us with things we don’t expect. Being an adult is about relationships, kids, careers, and growing in to a successful human being. Having increased responsibilities and expectations, often we work towards taking care of them, and in consequence, neglect ourselves.

There’s a lot going on in the life of an adult. Life is hard, but manageable. Sometimes we need help and it’s OK to ask for it. We can’t always do it ourselves, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. Asking for help doesn’t mean we are weak or a failure, it just means we are human.

Some of the signs that you might need to ask for help or get help for someone else are:

  • Feeling hopeless, helpless, worthless, pessimistic and/or guilty
  • Substance abuse
  • Fatigue or loss of interest in ordinary activities, including sex
  • Disturbances in eating and sleeping patterns
  • Irritability, increased crying, anxiety or panic attacks
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering or making decisions
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Persistent physical symptoms or pains that do not respond to treatment
  • Sense of purposelessness
  • Anger
  • The feeling of being trapped
  • The feeling of hopelessness
  • Having withdrawls from family, friends, work, school, or your favorite hobbies
  • Recklessness or high-risk behaviors
  • Preoccupation with death
  • Losing interest in things that you care about
  • Drastic mood changes
  • Making arrangements or setting your affairs in order
  • Giving things away, especially prized possessions

If you or someone you know is exhibiting these risk factors, it is important to know there is hope and help available. Once you have recognized the signs, you need to respond to the risk in asking about suicide. If you are thinking it, they might be as well. Once you are aware that there is a risk for suicide, there are many opportunities for you to REACT in seeking help in:Persistent sad or “empty” mood

  • Actively encourage the person to see a physician or mental health professional immediately
  • Removing  firearms, prescription medication and other potential means from the area.
  • Stay with the person until they get additional help.
  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline number for additional assistance.

Remember There is HOPE, Ask for HELP, Choose LIFE.

Resources for Adults

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a 24-hour, toll-free suicide prevention service available to anyone in suicidal crisis. If you need help call now. You will be routed to the closest possible crisis center in your area. 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

ManTherapy

An interactive website featuring blustery & manly therapist “Dr. Rich Mahogany”, Man Therapy seeks to counter the stigma associated with therapy by reaching out to men with humor and manly banter. Visitors to the site can take an “18 point head inspection”, watch videos about men who have overcome serious challenges in life, and also find ways to seek help for themselves or someone else. Dr. Rich Mahogany along with the Colorado Office of Suicide Prevention, Carson J Spencer Foundation and Cactus, Man Therapy(TM) is giving men a resource they desperately need; to help them with any problem that life sends their way, something to set them straight on the realities of suicide and mental health, and in the end a tool to help put a stop to the suicide deaths.

Grief Speaks

The mission of Grief speaks is to normalize grief in our “get over it” and “move on” society. The vision to give every child, teenager and adult permission to grieve in his or her own way and time, through all different types of losses and transitions.

Suicide Awareness/Voices of Recovery

The mission of SAVE is to prevent suicide through public awareness and education, eliminate stigma and serve as a resource to those touched by suicide. SAVE was started in 1989 when six suicide survivors (people who have experienced the loss of a loved one to suicide) met and agreed on the need for an organization. The organization is comprised mostly of suicide survivors, and people that have suffered from.

NAMI

NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness) is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to improving the lives of persons living with serious mental illness and their families. Dedicated NAMI members, leaders and friends work tireless across all levels to meet a shared NAMI mission of support, education, advocacy and research for people living with mental illness.

The National Council

The National Council is the unifying voice of America’s community mental health and substance use treatment organizations. Together with our 2,000+ member organizations employing 750,000 staff, we serve our nation’s most vulnerable citizens – more than 8 million adults and children living with mental illnesses and addiction disorders.The mission of SAVE is to prevent suicide through public awareness and education, eliminate stigma and serve as a resource to those touched by suicide. SAVE was started in 1989 when six suicide survivors (people who have experienced the loss of a loved one to suicide) met and agreed on the need for an organization. The organization is comprised mostly of suicide survivors, and people that have suffered from.

National Institute on Drug Abuse

The National Institute on Drug Abuse’s mission is to lead the Nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction. This charge has two critical components: (1) is the strategic support and conduct of research across a broad range of disciplines; (2) is ensuring the rapid and effective dissemination and use of the results of that research to significantly improve prevention and treatment and to inform policy as it relates to drug abuse and addiction.

ZEROSuicide

Zero Suicide is a key concept of the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention, a priority of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention (Action Alliance), and a project of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC). The foundational belief of Zero Suicide is that suicide deaths for individuals under care within health and behavioral health systems are preventable. It presents both goal and an aspirational challenge.

Mental Health America

Mental Health America (MHA) – founded in 1909 – is the nation’s leading community-based non-profit dedicated to helping all Americans achieve wellness by living mentally healthier lives. Our work is driven by our commitment to promote mental health as a critical part of overall wellness, including prevention services for all, early identification and intervention for those at risk, and integrated care and treatment for those who need it, with recovery as the goal. Much of our current work is guided by the Before Stage 4 (#B4Stage4) philosophy – that mental health conditions should be treated long before they reach the most critical points in the disease process.

Gambling Helpline

This website offers a 24/7 helpline guide those in an addiction crisis through a phone conversation or email.

Now MatterNow

Now Matter Now, sponsored by AFSP, is a website offering stories of hope, skills and support for coping with suicidal thoughts.